3rd Grade Math IEP Goal Bank Based On The Common Core Standards

Goal banks! Wahoo! This goal bank provides IEP goal examples based on the common core standards. If you are looking for more general “plug and chug” IEP goal formula’s check my other post out. These goals are only examples based on specific mathematical concept. You may need to modify how often they are measured, when they are tested, or simplify the related goal. Also keep in mind that sometimes students will be in a different grade level, but be working on a 3rd grade level skill. Your job as the teacher is to pick the goal type that fits with the student’s data driven needs.

P.S.

I changed the way I measured goals frequently throughout. It is worth it to skim through each section and receive more ideas for wording and measuring goals!

Operations and Algebraic Thinking

Represent and solve problems involving multiplication and division

QA.A.1

Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 × 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a total number of objects can be expressed as 5 × 7.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.A.1

Goal Example #1: Student will be able to independently describe one math scenario for a given multiplication problem on 10 individual trials, with 100% accuracy, through out the IEP year.

Goal Example #2: Using a picture, student will be able to identify three math scenarios that would require a specific multiplication problem. Mastery of this skill will be completing an average accuracy rate of 90%, on a given test with 6 choices, across 3 consecutive trials

QA.A.2

Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 56 ÷ 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each. For example, describe a context in which a number of shares or a number of groups can be expressed as 56 ÷ 8.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.A.2

Goal Example #1: Student will be able to create a visual representation of a specific division problem (up to multiples of 5), with 80% accuracy across 8 out of 10 trials across one quarter.

Goal Example #2: Student will be able to read and identify a correct written scenario for a specific division problem. On a test with 3 trials, student will score an average of 80% accuracy, across 40 weekly trials.

QA.A.3

Use multiplication and division within 100 to solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities, e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.A.3

Goal Example: Using a graphic organizer, student will be able to break down the three steps to solve a division word problem, with 80% accuracy across 10 weekly trials.

QA.A4

Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = _ ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.A.4

Goal Example: Using a multiplication chart, student will be able to read a word problem about multiplication and write the mathematical sentence needed to solve the problem. Mastery will occur when student completes 3 out of 5 test questions, with an average of 80% accuracy across 40 trials.

Understand properties of multiplication and the relationship between multiplication and division.

QA.B.5

Apply properties of operations as strategies to multiply and divide.2 Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 + 2) = (8 × 5) + (8 × 2) = 40 + 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.B.5

Goal Example #1: Student will be able to match three examples of the commutative property with 4 out of 5 trials on with 80% accuracy, across 3 quarters.

Goal Example #2: When given a key, student will be able to identify commutative, associative, and distributive properties with 75% accuracy on 3 consecutive trials.

QA.B.6

Understand division as an unknown-factor problem. For example, find 32 ÷ 8 by finding the number that makes 32 when multiplied by 8.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.B.6

Goal Example #1: Given a multiplication table/graph, Student will be able to solve a division problem using multiplication skills with 80% accuracy across 3 out of 3 trials.

Goal Example #2: Student will be able to add multiples to find the answer to two digit by one digit division problems. This is mastered when student can do this independently with 90% accuracy on 3 consecutive trials.

Multiply and divide within 100

QA.C.7

Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.C.7

Goal Example #1: Using a multiplication chart, student will be able to solve division problems up to 12 with 95% accuracy on 5 consecutive trials.

Goal Example #2: Student will be able to multiply double digit by double digit numbers with an average 70% accuracy on 3 trials each quarter this IEP year.

Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic

QA.D.8

Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.3

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.D.8

Goal Example #1: Using a graphic organizer, solve two step addition word problems within numbers 1-100. Student will show mastery by solving these with 70% accuracy across 10 trials this IEP year.

Goal Example #2: Student will be able to identify which operation is being used (multiplication, division, addition, subtraction) with 80% accuracy averaged between their 10 most recent trials.

QA.D.9

Identify arithmetic patterns (including patterns in the addition table or multiplication table), and explain them using properties of operations. For example, observe that 4 times a number is always even, and explain why 4 times a number can be decomposed into two equal addends.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.3.OA.D.9

Goal Example #1: When given a set of numbers from the teacher, student will be able to identify if there is a pattern or not. Student will do this with 90% accuracy on 3 out of 5 trials.

Goal Example #2: Student will be able to create a picture to explain patterns with multiplication up to 100 with an average of 70% accuracy across 10 trials.

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